Financial News: Europe, Gold, & the Fed

by Wes Bridel on October 10, 2011

in Economic Updates

The financial news is teeming with fascinating (if often disturbing) information. We’re bringing the top stories of the last month to you here in this post and one or two more to follow.  You can find a recent post of this type that we did here.  The articles that stood out over the last month are in the double digits, and I think it might be more interesting to bring them to you randomly rather than by topic so that in each post you get some different kind of information.

Financial News Articles:

1) EMU Crises Deepens as Slump Reaches Europe’s AAA Core - It has been long thought by many that Germany, the Netherlands, and a few other countries would be able to grow Europe’s periphery out of its slump, but now growth in the core has slowed to a halt.  This article examines the situation.

2) Precious Metals Now Poised for Next Move Up – This article does an excellent job of showing the preposterous situation of the gold markets (and their suppression scheme) by showing that the gold price has managed to hardly budge while New York’s COMEX was open even during a 45% run up in the worldwide market.  Now how could that be possible?  Embry has other great points as usual.

3) The Nixon Shock – An article explaining how the US came to abandon the Gold Standard.  It seems like ancient history to most Americans today, but it was (and IS) a very big deal.  A deceased family member even shows up in this one!

4) The Fed is a Rogue Elephant – This “wonkish rant” shows that inflation is kicking into high gear and how Ben Bernanke is willfully ignoring this fact for his own purposes (and we might add, even though that is supposed to be his one core job).

Watch the currently ongoing economic update video series for more broadly covered financial news of great importance at: 1)  Europe Economic Update 1, 2) Europe Economic Update 2, & 3) Europe Crises Explained.

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